University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU) - Research portal

Logo BOKU Resarch Portal

Gewählte Master / Diploma Thesis:

Ursula Vymetal (2016): MICROPLASTICS IN BANKFILTRATED DANUBE WATER.
Master / Diploma Thesis - Institut für Siedlungswasserbau, Industriewasserwirtschaft und Gewässerschutz (SIG), BOKU-Universität für Bodenkultur, pp 90. UB BOKU obvsg FullText

Data Source: ZID Abstracts
Abstract:
Massive accumulation of plastic and microplastic particles has been reported in marine ecosystems, posing a risk to the biota. Less attention has been given to freshwater ecosystems. Since plastic particles have been found in the Danube, the question arises whether these can pass through the bank filtration into the drinking water. This research therefore aims to address this question by evaluating microplastic particles > 30 μm in Danube water, bank filtrate and groundwater. Two sampling methods were applied in this study. One method used three stainless steel filter holders (Stainless Steel Cascade- SSC) and the other system consisted of five cartridge filters (Blue Filter Cascade- BFC), equipped with nylon filters of descending pore sizes (500 - 5 μm) and cellulose nitrate filters (1.2 μm), in order to create a cascade. The methods were used at five sampling sites close to the Danube to extract particles of different size fractions. In addition to sampling, particle counting and turbidity measurements were carried out. In the laboratory, various separation and collection methods such as density separation with a saturated NaCl solution, a chemical separation and an ultrasonic separation were performed. The best results were obtained by density separation. Separated particles > 30 μm were characterized with the Raman spectrometer. It was possible to identify microplastic particles in two Danube water samples. No microplastics > 30 μm could be detected in the bank filtrate or in groundwater. Furthermore, recovery experiments with the SSC with microplastic particles (500 - 20 μm) were executed. The recovery rate was 89 % in average.

Beurteilende(r): Fürhacker Maria

© BOKU Wien Imprint