BOKU - Universität für Bodenkultur Wien - Forschungsinformationssystem

Logo BOKU-Forschungsportal

Gewählte Publikation:

Bartko, J; Gludovacz, E; Petroczi, K; Borth, N; Jilma, B; Boehm, T.
(2016): Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide
ALCOHOL. 2016; 54: 51-59. FullText FullText_BOKU

Abstract:
Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.13) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Autor/innen der BOKU Wien:
Borth Nicole
BOKU Gendermonitor:


Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
Human diamine oxidase
Ethanol and metabolites
Alcohol deterrents
Inhibition of enzymatic activity
Histamine toxicity


Altmetric:
© BOKU Wien Impressum