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Gewählte Publikation:

Porro, D; Gasser, B; Fossati, T; Maurer, M; Branduardi, P; Sauer, M; Mattanovich, D.
(2011): Production of recombinant proteins and metabolites in yeasts: when are these systems better than bacterial production systems?
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2011; 89(4):939-948 FullText FullText_BOKU

Abstract:
Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins and metabolites from naturally non-producing cells. Since human insulin was the first heterologous compound produced in a laboratory in 1977, rDNA technology has become one of the most important technologies developed in the 20th century. Recombinant protein and metabolites production is a multi-billion dollar market. The development of a new product begins with the choice of the cell factory. The final application of the compound dictates the main criteria that should be taken into consideration: (1) quality, (2) quantity, (3) yield and (4) space time yield of the desired product. Quantity and quality are the most predominant requirements that must be considered for the commercial production of a protein. Quantity and yield are the requirements for the production of a metabolite. Finally, space time yield is crucial for any production process. It therefore becomes clear why the perfect host does not exist yet, and why-despite important advances in rDNA applications in higher eukaryotic cells-microbial biodiversity continues to represent a potential source of attractive cell factories. In this review, we compare the advantages and limitations of the principal yeast and bacterial workhorse systems.
Autor*innen der BOKU Wien:
Gasser Brigitte
Mattanovich Diethard
Sauer Michael
BOKU Gendermonitor:


Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
Recombinant proteins
Recombinant metabolites
Bacterial host systems
Yeast host systems
Industrial biotechnology


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